Poundmaker Museum Opening: With thanks to David MacKinnon and Roxanne Tootoosis

It was a fabulous day for the grand opening of the Poundmaker Museum at Poundmaker Cree Nation. The museum itself is a wealth of historical knowledge. The opening included various dignitaries including elders who spoke of the history of the resistance of 1885. The site is gorgeous and well placed, overlooking the battlefield in which Colonel Otter’s forces were defeated. Chief Poundmaker’s tomahawk and rifle were displayed. Request was made for the exoneration of Poundmaker. One of the dignitaries, Blaine Favel, said it eloquently: “You can’t have truth and reconciliation without the truth.” Kudos to the curator Floyd Favel, Sask Culture and all those responsible for the development of such a wonderful place commemorating such an important piece of history.

CBC’s coverage of the event can be found here: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/saskatoon/poundmaker-artifacts-saskatchewan-museum-exhibit-1.4191865

Thanks to Roxanne Tootoosis for permisson to share some of her photos of the event right on her own home turf!

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

2017: paskowipîsim / ᐸᐢᑯᐏᐲᓯᒼ / July

July 2017Thanks to Solomon Ratt for allowing the Cree Literacy Network to share his 2017 calendar, complete with his own original illustrations. Following his request, we will post one image at the beginning of each month. For those who like to plan a little further in advance, a link to complete pdfs is included here:
Y- and Th-Dialect Version: http://creeliteracy.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/2017CalendarCorrected_Whole.pdf
N- and Th-Dialect Version: http://creeliteracy.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/2017CalendarN.pdf

Posted in Calendar, Seasonal | Tagged , | Leave a comment

kiskisiwin | remembering: Martha Stiegman and Jesse Thistle

A short but profound counter-narrative to Canada 150: First Nations people should not have to go to university to learn that they were here first. Powerful images, powerful words. Thank you, Jesse Thistle, for permission to share this here.

kiskisiwin | remembering

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Father’s Day Wiener Roast: #CreeSimonSays: Simon Bird

A warning from your (môniyâw editor): Don’t try this without adequate (Cree) supervision.
Made with Perfect Video
Posted in CreeSimonSays | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Health Canada: Canada’s Food Guide in Plains Cree and in Woods Cree, 2009


I was excited to find this 2009 edition of Canada’s food guide prepared in Cree and in other FN languages. I wish I knew who deserves the credit for this really useful translation work. It is provided there for sharing, so I’m including a link here, and also a copy of the pdf that they offer for free download. I bet there are Cree teachers out there already thinking of ways to use this in the classroom!

Click here to view the document in its original location, and find other language versions:

http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fn-an/pubs/fnim-pnim/index-eng.php

Click here to download the complete pdf:

2009-food-guide-aliment-plains-cree

2009-food-guide-aliment-woods-cree

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

2017: pâskâwihowipîsim / ᐹᐢᑳᐏᐦᐅᐏᐲᓯᒼ / June

June 2017Thanks to Solomon Ratt for allowing the Cree Literacy Network to share his 2017 calendar, complete with his own original illustrations. Following his request, we will post one image at the beginning of each month. For those who like to plan a little further in advance, a link to complete pdfs is included here:
YY- and Th-Dialect Version: http://creeliteracy.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/2017CalendarCorrected_Whole.pdf
N- and Th-Dialect Version: http://creeliteracy.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/2017CalendarN.pdf

Posted in Calendar, Seasonal | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Canada 150: Let’s celebrate survival – Solomon Ratt (y-dialect)

Canada 150 years celebrations…but what do we First Nations people celebrate? Let’s celebrate that we still speak our languages; let’s celebrate that we still follow our traditions; let’s celebrate our resilience; let’s celebrate that we still live on our land although for 150 years government policy tried to kill us. Let’s celebrate life.

Canada mitâtahtomitanaw mîna niyânanomitanaw askîwina miyawâtamowin…kîkwây mâka kiyânaw iyiniwak takî-miyawâtamahk? miyawâtêtân kiyâpic ê-pîkiskwêyahk kipîkiskwêwininawa; miyawâtêtân kiyâpic ê-pimitisahamahk kayâs isihcikêwin; miyawâtêtân êyikohk ê-sîpihkisiyahk; miyawâtêtân ê-paspiyahk, kiyâpic ê-pimihkamikisiyahk kitaskînahk âta kihc-ôkimâwin mitâtahtomitanaw mîna niyânanomitanaw askîwina ê-pê-kakwê-mêscihikoyahk. miyawâtêtân pimâtisiwin.

ᑲᓇᑕ  ᒥᑖᑕᐦᑐᒥᑕᓇᐤ ᒦᓇ ᓂᔮᓇᓄᒥᑕᓇᐤ ᐊᐢᑮᐏᓇ ᒥᔭᐚᑕᒧᐏᐣ  ᙮᙮᙮  ᑮᒁᕀ ᒫᑲ ᑭᔮᓇᐤ ᐃᔨᓂᐘᐠ ᑕᑮᒥᔭᐚᑕᒪᕽ?  ᒥᔭᐚᑌᑖᐣ ᑭᔮᐱᐨ  ᐁᐲᑭᐢᑵᔭᕽ ᑭᐲᑭᐢᑵᐏᓂᓇᐘ᙮  ᒥᔭᐚᑌᑖᐣ ᑭᔮᐱᐨ ᐁᐱᒥᑎᓴᐦᐊᒪᕽ ᑲᔮᐢ ᐃᓯᐦᒋᑫᐏᐣ᙮  ᒥᔭᐚᑌᑖᐣ ᐁᔨᑯᕽ ᐁᓰᐱᐦᑭᓯᔭᕽ᙮  ᒥᔭᐚᑌᑖᐣ ᐁᐸᐢᐱᔭᕽ,  ᑭᔮᐱᐨ  ᐁᐱᒥᐦᑲᒥᑭᓯᔭᕽ ᑭᑕᐢᑮᓇᕽ ᐋᑕ ᑭᐦᒍᑭᒫᐏᐣ ᒥᑖᑕᐦᑐᒥᑕᓇᐤ ᒦᓇ ᓂᔮᓇᓄᒥᑕᓇᐤ ᐊᐢᑮᐏᓇ ᐁᐯᑲᑵᒣᐢᒋᐦᐃᑯᔭᕽ᙮  ᒥᔭᐚᑌᑖᐣ ᐱᒫᑎᓯᐏᐣ᙮

(( Solomon Ratt: You can say that again! kihtwâm êkosi kakî-itwân. ᑮᐦᑤᒼ ᐁᑯᓯ ᑲᑭᑤᐣ᙮ ))

Posted in Audio (y-dialect), Solomon Ratt, Video | Leave a comment

Cousin Simon: #CreeSimonSays: Simon Bird and #LilMoshom

Made with Perfect Video

 

Posted in CreeSimonSays | Tagged , , | 1 Comment

Canada, O Canada, 150 Years – Solomon Ratt (th-dialect with audio)

Portage Student Residence glee club in the costumes worn in 1967 at Canada’s centennial Expo. On its letterhead and signage during this time, the residence advertised itself as “The Home of Canada’s Singing Indians.” United Church of Canada Archives, 93.049P/1756.

Cultural appropriation is big news in Canada this week. This photo of FN residential school students, dressed up by non-FN teachers to look like the “right kind” of Indians is an unfortunately apt illustration of how authentic First Nations culture can be scrubbed right out of the picture in favour of some misguided imaginary ideal.

Canada, oh Canada, 150* askîwinaᑳᓇᑕ, ᐆ ᑳᓇᑕ, 150* ᐊᐢᑮᐏᓇCanada, oh Canada, 150 years
î-kitinihcik ithiniwak:ᐄᑭᑎᓂᐦᒋᐠ ᐃᖨᓂᐘᐠ: of suppression of First Nations peoples:
î-othasowâtacik îkâ kita-pimitisahahkwâw ithiniw-isîhcikîwina -ᐄ ᐅᖬᓱᐚᑕᒋᐠ ᐄᑳ ᑭᑕᐱᒥᑎᓴᐦᐊᐦᒁᐤ ᐃᖨᓂᐤ ᐃᓰᐦᒋᑮᐏᓇ by out-lawing cultural practices -
nakwatisowina, pwâtisimowina, matotisâna;ᓇᑿᑎᓱᐏᓇ, ᑅᑎᓯᒧᐏᓇ, ᒪᑐᑎᓵᓇthe potlatches, the powwows, the sweat-lodges;
masinahikanêkinos poko ta-ayât kîspin ta-nakatahk iskonikan - ta-nitonahk atoskîwin;ᒪᓯᓇᐦᐃᑲᓀᑭᓄᐢ ᐳᑯ ᑕ ᐊᔮᐟ ᑮᐢᐱᐣ ᑕ ᓇᑲᑕᕽ ᐃᐢᑯᓂᑲᐣ: ᑕᓂᑐᓇᕽ ᐊᑐᐢᑮᐏᐣby the pass system needed to leave the reserve - to seek work;
âta nîstanân nikî-nitawi-nôtinikânân ispî kâ-nôtinitonânowik,ᐋᑕ ᓃᐢᑕᓈᐣ ᓂᑮᓂᑕᐏᓅᑎᓂᑳᓈᐣ ᐃᐢᐲ ᑳᓅᑎᓂᑐᓈᓄᐏᐠ,although we too went to fight in your wars,
mâka nîkân poko ta-pakitinamâhk nitiskonikan-akihtâsowininâna,ᒫᑲ ᓃᑳᐣ ᐳᑯ ᑕᐱᑭᑎᓇᒫᕽ ᓂᑎᐢᑯᓂᑲᐣ ᐸᑭᐦᑖᓱᐏᓂᓈᓇ,but first we had to give up our Treaty rights,
ikwa ispî kâ-pî-kîwîyâhk namwâc nimîthikawinân simâkanisihkân-mitho-tôtâkîwinaᐃᑿ ᐃᐢᐲ ᑳᐲᑮᐑᔮᕽ ᓇᒹᐨ ᓂᒦᖨᑲᐏᓈᐣ ᓯᒫᑲᓂᓯᐦᑳᐣ ᒥᖪᑑᑖᑮᐏᓇand when we returned we were denied veteran benefits
namwâc nikakî-kîwânân, namacî nikî-pakitinînân nitiskonikan-akihtâsowininâna.ᓇᒹᐨ ᓂᑲᑮᑮᐚᓈᐣ, ᓇᒪᒌ ᓂᑮᐸᑭᑎᓃᓈᐣ ᓂᑎᐢᑯᓂᑲᐣ ᐊᑭᐦᑖᓱᐏᓂᓈᓇ᙮and we could not return home, after all we gave up our Treaty Status
Canada, oh Canada, 150 askîwinaᑳᓇᑕ, ᐆ ᑳᓇᑕ, 150 ᐊᐢᑮᐏᓇCanada, oh Canada, 150 years
î-mîscihowiyan - nîkân kimîscihâwak paskwâwi-mostosak -ᐄᒦᐢᒋᐦᐅᐏᔭᐣ ᓃᑳᐣ ᑭᒦᐢᒋᐦᐋᐘᐠ ᐸᐢᒁᐏᒧᐢᑐᓴᐠ ᑲᐢᒁᐏᒧᐢᑐᓴᐠof genocide - first you killed the buffalo -
ikwa awâsisak kikî-kwâsihâwak ohpimî ta-nitawi-kiskinwahamâkocik ayamihikimâwaᐃᑿ ᐊᐚᓯᓴᐠ ᑭᑮᒁᓯᐦᐋᐘᐠ ᐅᐦᐱᒦ ᑕᓂᑕᐏᑭᐢᑭᓌᐦᐊᒫᑯᒋᐠ ᐊᔭᒥᐦᐃᑭᒫᐘthen kidnapped the children to go to church-run residential schools
ita kâ-kî-nôcihiyâhk ispî kâ-pîkiskwîyâhk nipîkiskwîwininânaᐃᑕ ᑳᑮᓅᒋᐦᐃᔮᕽ ᐃᐢᐲ ᑳᐲᑭᐢᑹᔮᕽᓂᐲᑭᐢᑹᐏᓂᓈᓇwhere you beat us for speaking our languages
ikosîsi nikî-kipihtinikawinân îkâ kitakiskîthihtamâhk nitithiniwi-isîhcikîwina mîna nikâkîsimowininâna ᐃᑯᓰᓯ ᓂᑮᑭᐱᐦᑎᓂᑲᐏᓈᐣ ᐄᑳ ᑭᑕᑭᐢᑮᖨᐦᑕᒫᕽ ᓂᑎᖨᓂᐏ ᐃᓰᐦᒋᑮᐏᓇ ᒦᓇ ᓂᑳᑮᓯᒧᐏᓂᓈᓇthus we were denied learning our cultural teachings and spiritual beliefs
kâ-kî-âniskô-kiskîthihtamâhk âcathohkîwinihk ohci -ᑳᑮᐋᓂᐢᑰᑭᐢᑮᖨᐦᑕᒫᕽ ᐋᒐᖪᐦᑮᐏᓂᕽ ᐅᐦᒋwhich were passed on through our traditional stories -
âcathohkîwina kâ-kî-kiskinwahamâkoyâhk kita-isi-pimâtisiyâhk ôta askîhk.ᐋᒐᖪᐦᑮᐏᓇ ᑳᑮᑭᐢᑭᓌᐦᐊᒫᑯᔮᕽ ᑭᑕᐃᓯᐱᒫᑎᓯᔮᕽ ᐆᑕ ᐊᐢᑮᕽ᙮ traditonal stories which taught us how to live on this earth.
ohpimî-kiskinwahamâtowikamikohk ita awâsisak kâ-kî-nâh-nôcihihcik ikwa kâ-kî-âh-otihtinihcik;ᐅᐦᐱᒦᑭᐢᑭᓌᐦᐊᒫᑐᐏᑲᒥᑯᕽ ᐃᑕ ᐊᐚᓯᓴᐠ ᑳᑮᓈᐦᓅᒋᐦᐃᐦᒋᐠ ᐃᑿ ᑳᑮᐋᐦᐅᑎᐦᑎᓂᐦᒋᐠ...residential schools where children were physically and sexually abused; 
awasimî kihci-mitâtahto-mitanaw kî-pôni-pimâtisiwak - mihcît namwâc kiskîthihtâkwan ita kâ-kî-nahahthihcik.ᐊᐘᓯᒦ ᑭᐦᒋᒥᑖᑕᐦᑐᒥᑕᓇᐤ ᑮᐴᓂᐱᒫᑎᓯᐘᐠ ᒥᐦᒌᐟ ᑭᐢᑮᖨᐦᑖᑿᐣ ᐃᑕ ᑳᑮᓇᐦᐊᐦᖨᐦᒋᐠ᙮thousands died - many buried in unmarked graves,
kâ-kîsi-ayamihcikiyâhk nikî-wâh-wanihonân, kapî athisk î-kî-kitîthimikawiyâhk namwâc nikî-kiskîthihtînân tânisi kita-isi-pamihisoyâhk.ᑳᑮᓯᐊᔭᒥᐦᒋᑭᔮᕽ ᓂᑮᐚᐦᐘᓂᐦᐅᓈᐣ, ᑲᐲ ᐊᖨᐢᐠ ᐄᑮᑭᑏᖨᒥᑲᐏᐋᕽ ᓇᒷᐨ ᓂᑮᑭᐢᑮᖨᐦᑏᓈᐣ ᑖᓂᓯ ᑭᑕᐃᓯᐸᒥᐦᐃᓱᔮᕽAfter leaving the schools we were lost, so institutionalized that we did not know how to live,
mihcît nikî-nisiwanâtahkamikisinân ikosi kipahotowikamikohk kita-ayâyâhk - kita-kipahokawiyâhk namacî mâka poko kâ-kiskîthihtamâhk -ᒥᐦᒌᐟ ᓂᑮᓂᓯᐘᓈᑕᐦᑲᒥᑭᓯᓈᐣ ᐃᑯᓯ ᑭᐸᐦᐅᑐᐏᑲᒥᑯᕽ ᑭᑕᐊᐋᔮᕽ ᑭᑕ ᑭᐸᐦᐅᑲᐏᔮᕽ ᓇᒪᒌ ᒫᑲ ᐳᑯ ᑳᑭᐢᑮᖨᐦᑕᒫᕽmany of us turned to crime so we'd go to jail - being inside is something we knew -
mihcît minihkwîwin ikwa maci-maskihkiya kî-nisiwanâcihikowak ikwa kâkikî nâh-nôtinikîskowak.ᒥᐦᒌᐟ ᒥᓂᐦᑹᐏᐣ ᐃᑿ ᒪᒋᒪᐢᑭᐦᑭᔭ ᑮᓂᓯᐘᓈᒋᐦᐃᑯᐘᐠ ᐃᑿ ᑳᑭᑮ ᓈᐦᓅᑎᓂᑮᐢᑯᐘᐠ᙮Many were destroyed by alcohol and drugs and are forever fighting.
Canada, oh Canada, 150 askîwinaᑳᓇᑕ, ᐆ ᑳᓇᑕ, 150 ᐊᐢᑮᐏᓇCanada, oh Canada, 150 years
î-pî-âh-yahcitinîwiyâhk nitaskînâhk.ᐄᐲᐋᐦᔭᐦᒋᑎᓃᐏᔮᕽ ᓂᑕᐢᑮᓈᕽ᙮ of being strangers in our homeland.
* 150: mitâtahtomitanaw mîna niyânanomitanaw / * 150: ᓂᑖᑕᐦᑐᒥᑕᓇᐤ ᒦᓇ ᓂᔮᓇᓄᒥᑕᓇᐤ
Posted in Audio (th-dialect), Canada Day, Solomon Ratt | Leave a comment

iskwêwak / ᐃᐢᑵᐘᐠ / Women – Solomon Ratt

iskwêwak:ᐃᐢᑵᐘᐠ:Women:
pimâcihiwêwakᐱᒫᒋᐦᐃᐍᐘᐠgive life,
kisêwâtisiwakᑭᓭᐚᑎᓯᐘᐠare kind,
sâkihiwêwakᓵᑭᐦᐃᐍᐘᐠgive love,
tapahtêyimisiwakᑕᐸᐦᑌᔨᒥᓯᐘᐠare humble,
sôhki-atoskêwakᓲᐦᑭ ᐊᑐᐢᑫᐘᐠwork hard,
sôhkisiwakᓲᐦᑭᓯᐘᐠare strong,
sôhkitêhêwakᓲᐦᑭᑌᐦᐁᐘᐠare brave,
âhkamêyimowak.ᐋᐦᑲᒣᔨᒧᐘᐠ᙮persevere.
iskwêwakᐃᐢᑵᐘᐠWomen:
takî-manâcihihcikᑕᑮᒪᓈᒋᐦᐃᐦᒋᐠshould be treated with care,
takî-kistêyimihcikᑕᑮᑭsᑌᔨᒥᐦᒋᐠshould be respected,
takî-kistêyihtâkosicikᑕᑮᑭᐢᑌᔨᐦᑖᑯᓯᒋᐠshould be held in high regard,
takî-sâkihihcik.ᑕᑮᓵᑭᐦᐃᐦᒋᐠ᙮should be loved.
Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment