Christmas Songs & Carols – 2016

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A collection of Christmas songs translated into Cree – mostly by Dolores Sand – who also kindly permitted the use of her audio recordings. Hope this helps out some of her fellow “Creechers” as they prepare for Christmas concert season!

Angels We have Heard on High

Ave Maria

The Chipmunk Christmas Song

The Huron Carol

Jingle Bells / sêwêyâkanak

The Little Drummer Boy

Mary Okosisa / Mary’s Boy Child

O Holy Night

Santa Claus is Coming to Town / Santa Claus wi-takosin

Silent Night / kāmwāci tipiskāw

Away in a Manger

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2016: pawâcakinisîsipîsim / ᐸᐚᒐᑭᓂᓰᓯᐲᓯᒼ / December

2017calendarn2016Calendar_Page_12

Thanks to Solomon Ratt for allowing the Cree Literacy Network to share his 2016 calendar, complete with his own original illustrations. Following his request, we will post one image at the beginning of each month. Click here for the full calendar for 2016:  2016Calendar

If you like planning a little further in advance, you can download a complete pdf of Sol’s new calendar for 2017 here:
Y- and Th-Dialect Version: http://creeliteracy.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/2017CalendarCorrected_Whole.pdf
N- and Th-Dialect Version: http://creeliteracy.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/2017CalendarN.pdf

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Online Weekly Cree Study Group with Dorothy Thunder

Painting by Jerry Whitehead from the collection of Dr David MacKinnon

Painting by Jerry Whitehead from the collection of Dr David MacKinnon

Register now for free, weekly online Cree study sessions facilitated by Dorothy Thunder, and sponosred by Nehiyawewin.ca. Classes begin the second week of January. The sessions will make use of an online whiteboard.

To register, use the “contact us” link on the site: http://nehiyawewin.ca/contact-us/.

The textbook to be used is Solomon Ratt’s Beginning Cree. Sol’s book can be ordered from McNally Robinson at http://www.mcnallyrobinson.com/9780889774353/solomon-ratt/beginning-cree?blnBKM=1

or from Amazon (where it’s listed as a best seller!)

https://www.amazon.ca/Beginning-Cree-Solomon-Ratt/dp/0889774358/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1480480973&sr=8-1&keywords=Solomon+Ratt

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tipiskâwi-pîsim kîthânaw / We are moon: Solomon Ratt (th-dialect, with audio)

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pithîsowak kîthânaw;
wâsaskotîpathowin kîthânaw;
tipiskâwi-pîsim kîthânaw
î-wastînamâkiyahk kaski-tipiskahk.

ᑭᖩᓱᐘᐠ  ᑮᖭᓇᐤ
ᐚᓴᐢᑯᑏᐸᖪᐏᐣ  ᑮᖭᓇᐤ
ᑎᐱᐢᑳᐏᐲᓯᒼ  ᑮᖭᓇᐤ
ᐄᐘᐢᑏᓇᒫᑭᔭᕽ  ᑲᐢᑭᑎᐱᐢᑲᕽ

We are thunder;
We are lightning;
We are moon;
shedding light in the dark of night.

Sol says: “Story about this: I woke up last night around 3:00 am with this in my head so I had to write it down. It’s about our inner power, which we all have.” (29 November 2016)

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tâniwâ / Where? Solomon Ratt (y-dialect, with audio)

One important way in which Cree differs from English has to do with verb number and gender agreement. In English there is only one “where” – and it works any place you’ve got a question about location.

In Cree, the word for “where” has to change to match the number and gender of the items you’re asking about (just as the verb does). To cover all of the possibilities, you need (at least) four different forms.

tâniwâ Where is he or she (for animate singulars)

tâniwê Where is it? (for inanimate singulars)

tâniwêhkâk (for animate plurals)

tâniwêhâ: Where are they, where is it? (for inanimate plural)

Translated back into English, they all still just mean “where” – but fluent Cree speakers know when to use which one.

Solomon prepared these images and audio files as a drill to help students memorize which where to use when! Corresponding audio appears below each slide (or at least, it should). Enjoy! (And if you find errors, please let us know through the comment link at the bottom of the post!)

slide01

Continue reading

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2016: ihkopîwipîsim / ᐃᐦᑯᐲᐏᐲᓯᒼ / November

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Thanks to Solomon Ratt for allowing the Cree Literacy Network to share his 2016 calendar, complete with his own original illustrations. Following his request, we will post one image at the beginning of each month. Click here for the full calendar for 2016:  2016Calendar

If you like planning a little further in advance, you can download a complete pdf of Sol’s new calendar for 2017 here:
Y- and Th-Dialect Version :  http://creeliteracy.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/2017CalendarCorrected_Whole.pdf
N- and Th-Dialect Version: http://creeliteracy.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/2017CalendarN.pdf

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Standing with Standing Rock: Water is Life (y-dialect)

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Thanks to Isaac Murdoch for permission to use his image, and to Sol for translation.

nikanawâpahkân. I am watching.
ôta nitayân. I am here.
nititisahên mawimoscikêwin. I send my prayers.

niwîci-sôhkâpawimâwak Standing Rock;
nipiy pimâtisiwiniwiw!
I stand firm with Standing Rock; water is life!

 

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Halloween Vocabulary from Wayne Goodspirit (y-dialect)

Solomon Zombie Ratt

Solomon Zombie Ratt

miyo-cîpayi-tipiskâwinisik

Happy Halloween Everyone!

Thanks to Wayne Goodspirit for sharing this list of Halloween vocabulary last year on Facebook, and to Sol for posing for this special-occasion portrait (as well as recording the vocabulary, divided into three audio files).

Apples to Flying:

Ghost to Stab:

Vampire, Witch, Zombie

EnglishSRO (y-dialect from Wayne Goodspirit)Syllabic
applespicikwâsakᐱᒋᒁᐘᐠ
batapahkwâcîsᐊᐸᐦᒁᒌᐢ
bite (bite right off someone)kîskamᑮᐢᑲᒼ
bite (bite someone)tahkwamᑕᐦᑿᒼ
bite (take bite off something)
black catkaskitêw-minôsᑲᐢᑭᑌᐤ ᒥᓅᐢ
broomstickwêpahikan, wêpahikanâhtikᐍᐸᐦᐃᑲᐣ
candied applessîwipicikwâsakᓰᐏᐱᒋᒁᓴᐠ
candiesmaskihkîsak, sîwinôsak ᒪᐢᑭᐦᑮᓴᐠ
costumeayiwinsîkân, wawiyasêhowin ᐊᔨᐏᐣᓰᑳᐣ
cut (cuts someone through)kîskahw (VTA), kîskisa (VTI) ᑮᐢᑲᐦᐤ
cut (cuts someone)manisw (VTA); manis (VTI)ᒪᓂᐢᐤ
darktipiskâhki, tipiskâki ᑎᐱᐢᑳᐦᑭ
dark (when it gets dark)wani-tipiskâhki/wani-tipiskâki ᐘᓂᑎᐱᐢᑲᐦᑭ
devilmacâyis, maci-manitowᒪᒑᔨᐢ, ᒪᒋᒪᓂᑐᐤ
eat (eat someone)môw ᒨᐤ
fear of somethingka-kostamihkᑲᑯᐢᑕᒥᕽ
flying (noun)pimihâwinᐱᒥᐦᐋᐏᐣ
flying (verb)pimihâᐱᒥᐦᐋ
ghostcîpayᒌᐸᐩ
gutsmitakisiyaᒥᑕᑭᓯᔭ
hair standing on endê-cimatêyiki-wêscakâsaᐁᒋᒪᑌᔨᑭ ᐍᐢᒐᑳᓴ
haunted housecîpay-kamik, âmatisowinᒌᐸᐩᑲᒥᐠ, ᐋᒪᑎᓱᐏᐣ
headmistikwânᒥᐢᑎᒁᐣ
kill (someone)nipahᓂᐸᐦ
maskmihkwâkanihkânᒥᐦᒁᑲᓂᐦᑳᐣ
moontipiskâw pîsimᑎᐱᐢᑳᐤ ᐲᓯᒼ
moonlightnîpâyâstêwᓃᐹᔮᐢᑌᐤ
nighttipiskâwᑎᐱᐢᑳᐤ
nightmaremaci-pawâmi, kostâcêhkwâmiᒪᒋᐸᐚᒥ, ᑯᐢᑖᒉᒁᒥ
possessê-kikiskâkot ê-macâyit, ê-macâyitᐁᑭᑭᐢᑳᑯᐟ ᐁᒪᒑᔨᐟ, ᐁᒪᒑᔨᐟ
possessed dollsmacâyawâsisihkânᒪᒑᔭᐚᓯᓯᐦᑳᐣ
pumpkinosâwipakᐅᓵᐏᐸᐠ
scaredsêkisiwᓭᑭᓯ
screamtâcikwêwᑖᒋᑵ
shiversêkiwêpayi, kostâcêwipayi, nanamipayi ᓭᑭᐍᐸᔨ, ᑯᑖᒉᐏᐸᔨ
skeletoncîpay-oskanaᒌᐸᐩ ᐅᐢᑲᓇ
snakekinêpikᑭᓀᐱᐠ
spiderapihkêsîs, ohcapihkêsîsᐊᐱᐦᑫᓰᐢ, ᐅᐦᒐᐱᐦᑫᓰᐢ
spider webapihkêsîs-ayapiyᐊᐱᐦᑫᓰᐢᐊᔭᐱᐩ
stab (stab someone)tahkamᑕᐦᑲᒼ
vampiremihko kâ-ôtâtahkᒥᐦᑯ
witchkiskwêkân-iskwêw, pawâkan iskwêwᑭᐢᑵᑳᐣ ᐃᐢᑵᐤ, ᐸᐚᑲᐣ ᐃᐢᑵᐤ
wolfmahihkanᒪᐦᐄᑲᐣ
wolfmanmahihkanêwiyiniwᒪᐦᐄᑲᓀᐏᔨᓂᐤ
yelltêpwêᑌᐻ
zombieonipiw ê-pimohtêtᐅᓂᐱᐤ ᐁᐱᒧᐦᑌᐟ

 

Posted in Audio (y-dialect), Halloween, Vocabulary | 1 Comment

Looking ahead to 2017: Solomon Ratt’s New Calendar

The never-idle Solomon Ratt has just provided me with two versions of his 2017 calendar: One for y- and th-dialects, the other for n- and th-dialects.

Y- and Th-Dialect Version: http://creeliteracy.org/?attachment_id=4866

N- and Th-Dialect Version: http://creeliteracy.org/?attachment_id=4867

You can download whichever suits you best and even have the pdf printed for your personal or classroom use with Sol’s best wishes and those of the Cree Literacy Network.

For those (like me) who prefer a more “flying pantses” style of planning, I have also scheduled month-by-month calendar posts (from the y-/th- version of the calendar) to be posted on the Cree Literacy Network just in time for the first of each month.

If you like, you can even receive an email alerting you to new CLN blog posts (including those calendar pages, right on time) by adding your email address on the right of this screen under “Subscribe to Cree Literacy Network”.

 

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Solomon Ratt: About Cree Names (th-dialect)

solsleepingofficeThe students in Sol’s Cree 225 class made him write this down because they couldn’t stop laughing when he told it in class. There are rules about when (and by whom) hilarious Cree nicknames can be used – just like there are rules for protecting your sacred name (as taught in the traditional story of the Little Startlers). Continue reading

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