A little Cree thinking about Math from Delvin Kanewiyakiho

Some basic practical math concepts, and basic vocabulary - a video from Delvin Kanewiyakiho created for the “Math people at the Catholic School Board office in Saskatoon.”

Some vocabulary from this video (in SRO, cited from the Wolvengrey Dictionary):

  • akihcikêwin ᐊᑭᐦᒋᑫᐃᐧᐣ NI counting (CW)
  • ê-akihcikêt ‘he or she is counting’
  • wâhyaw ᐋᐧᐦᔭᐤ IPC far, far away (CW)
  • cîki ᒌᑭ IPC close, close by, near, nearby, near to (CW)
  • mistahi ᒥᐢᑕᐦᐃ IPC much, greatly, a great deal, a lot, lots; very, very many; very much so (CW)
  • apisîs ᐊᐱᓰᐢ IPC a little, a little bit (CW)

Search “Delvin Kanewiyakiho” on Youtube for dozens of other useful nêhiyawêwin words of the day.

 

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Fort Rouge 1738 – from La Compagnie de La Vérendrye

Fort Rouge 1738Click the links below to watch this beautiful little video production that recreates dialog in French and Cree from the journals of La Vérendrye. Cree Chief played by Ken Paupanekis, guide by Robert Falcon-Ouellette. There are two subtitled versions. Listen to the Cree! Spoken French and Cree (with English subtitles)
and
Spoken French and Cree (with French subtitles for the Cree)

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21st Century Tools for Indigenous Languages – Kickoff Workshop

A few photos of the Cree Literacy Network in action in Edmonton for a workshop on development of 21st Century Tools for Indigenous Languages. Wonderful discussions around Cree language, linguistics, and helping build tools that will support them! Hoping to get out in a bit to join the National Aboriginal Day celebrations.

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Publication of a Grammar of the Cree Language

Arden Ogg:

Congratulations to Lynn Drapeau on a lifetime achievement in publishing this Grammaire de la Langue Innue (the variety of Cree spoken on the north shore of the St Lawrence in Québec), and to kepin for sharing it via his new blog!

Click here to hear Yvette Mollen and Hélène St Onge give their endorsement of the grammar on behalf of l’Institut Tshakapesh.

Originally posted on kepin omasinahikewin:

Grammaire de la langue innue

Last week marked the publication of the Grammaire de la langue innue, the first ever modern and comprehensive grammar of the Cree language. So while I usually lay my head down around eleven o’clock, for the past few days my eyes have remained open long after the time of my nightly reclination as I diligently read through each of its 602 pages.

For those unversed in the study of the Cree language or its various appellations, what is here referred to as the Innu language is a group of Cree dialects spoken by around 11,000 people along the north shore of what is now generally known as the St-Lawrence River in Québec. Yet, despite the title of the book, there is no such thing as a homogeneous Innu language. Instead, the book introduces us to a variety of dialects who, for historical and political reasons, have come to be grouped under that term.

Differences aside, the speakers of…

View original 325 more words

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 7. Passing on teachings – âniskô-kiskinwahamâkêwin – ᐋᓂᐢᑰ ᑭᐢᑭᓇᐧᐦᐊᒫᑫᐃᐧᐣ 

Solomon Ratt: Cree Cultural Teachings – nêhiyaw-isîhcikêwin – ᓀᐦᐃᔭᐤᐃᓯᐦᒋᑫᐃᐧ

Values7


pêyakwâw ê-nîpîhk nikî-nitawi-papâmiskânân mâmihk âmaciwîspimowinihk ohci, ê-pimitishamâhk mâhtâwi-sîpiy. nikî-cîmâwak nitôtêmak. nikî-ati-kapêsinân pâwiscikosihk nistam kâ-tipiskâk êkwa ê-ati-wâpahk kihtwâm nikî-pôsinân, ê-asowhamahk sâkahikanisîs. piysik wapâsihk nikî-takocimânân, kâ-mâyiciwasik isiyihkâtêw anima wapâs. kêtahtaw kâ-matwê-têwêcik nitôtêmak. “ohcistin kitôtinaw!”

ᐯᔭᑳᐧᐤ  ᐁ ᓃᐲᕁ  ᓂᑮ ᓂᑕᐃᐧ ᐸᐹᒥᐢᑳᓈᐣ  ᒫᒥᕁ  ᐋᒪᒋᐄᐧᐢᐱᒧᐃᐧᓂᕁ  ᐅᐦᒋ,  ᐁ ᐱᒥᑎᐢᐦᐊᒫᕁ  ᒫᐦᑖᐃᐧ ᓰᐱᕀ᙮  ᓂᑮ ᒌᒫᐊᐧᐠ  ᓂᑑᑌᒪᐠ᙮  ᓂᑮ ᐊᑎ ᑲᐯᓯᓈᐣ  ᐹᐃᐧᐢᒋᑯᓯᕁ  ᓂᐢᑕᒼ  ᑳ ᑎᐱᐢᑳᐠ  ᐁᑲᐧ  ᐁ ᐊᑎ ᐋᐧᐸᕁ  ᑭᐦᑖᐧᒼ  ᓂᑮ ᐴᓯᓈᐣ,  ᐁ ᐊᓱᐤᐦᐊᒪᕁ  ᓵᑲᐦᐃᑲᓂᓰᐢ᙮  ᐱᕀᓯᐠ  ᐊᐧᐹᓯᕁ  ᓂᑮ ᑕᑯᒋᒫᓈᐣ,  ᑳ ᒫᔨᒋᐊᐧᓯᐠ  ᐃᓯᔨᐦᑳᑌᐤ  ᐊᓂᒪ  ᐊᐧᐹᐢ᙮  ᑫᑕᐦᑕᐤ  ᑳ ᒪᑌᐧ ᑌᐁᐧᒋᐠ  ᓂᑑᑌᒪᐠ᙮  “ᐅᐦᒋᐢᑎᐣ  ᑭᑑᑎᓇᐤ!”

One summer we went canoeing downriver from Stanley Mission. Following the Churchill River. I went with my friends.. We camped at Little Stanley Rapids the first night and went on our way the next day crossing the little lake eventually arriving at a narrows, known as ‘place of difficult currents” (Frog Narrows). All of a sudden my friends hollered, “Our boat is leaking!”

nikî-itâpin mostitakohk, wahwâ! tâpwê mâni-mâka, nikî-ohcistinisinân.

ᓂᑮ ᐃᑖᐱᐣ  ᒧᐢᑎᑕᑯᐦᐠ,  ᐊᐧᐦᐋᐧ!  ᑖᐯᐧ  ᒫᓂ ᒫᑲ,  ᓂᑮ ᐅᐦᒋᐢᑎᓂᓯᓈᐣ᙮

I looked at the bottom of the canoe and sure enough we were leaking!

“ahâw, cêskwa. kika-sîskipitênaw cîmân miniscikosihk misakâyâhki,” nikî-itâwak.

“ᐊᐦᐋᐤ,  ᒉᐢᑲᐧ᙮  ᑭᑲ ᓰᐢᑭᐱᑌᓇᐤ  ᒌᒫᐣ  ᒥᓂᐢᒋᑯᓯᕁ  ᒥᓴᑳᔮᐦᑭ,”  ᓂᑮ ᐃᑖᐊᐧᐠ᙮

“Okay, just wait. We’ll pull the canoe to shore at a little island when we arrive there.” I told them.

ispîhk kâ-miskâyâhk miniscikosihk nkî-sîskipitênân cîmân êkwa nikî-kwatapinênân. nikî-itâwak nitôtêmak ta-kotawêcik êkwa niya nikî-kospin ê-nitonawak pikiw minahikohk. nikî-miskawâw.

ᐃᐢᐲᕁ  ᑳ ᒥᐢᑳᔮᕁ  ᒥᓂᐢᒋᑯᓯᕁ  ᐣᑮ ᓰᐢᑭᐱᑌᓈᐣ  ᒌᒫᐣ  ᐁᑲᐧ  ᓂᑮ ᑲᐧᑕᐱᓀᓈᐣ᙮  ᓂᑮ ᐃᑖᐊᐧᐠ  ᓂᑑᑌᒪᐠ  ᑕ ᑯᑕᐁᐧᒋᐠ  ᐁᑲᐧ  ᓂᔭ  ᓂᑮ ᑯᐢᐱᐣ  ᐁ ᓂᑐᓇᐊᐧᐠ  ᐱᑭᐤ  ᒥᓇᐦᐃᑯᐦᐠ᙮  ᓂᑮ ᒥᐢᑲᐋᐧᐤ᙮

When we arrived at the little island we pulled the canoe to shore and tipped it over. I told my friends to build a campfire and I went inland looking for pitch on a pine tree. I found some.

ispîhk kâ-pê-nâsipêhtêyân kî-takahki-kwahkotêw kotawân.  êkota nikî-ati-tihkiswâw ana minahik-pikiw. kâ-kî-kîsi-tihkisot ana pikiw nikî-ati-mîsahên nicîmâniminân êwako pikiw ê-âpacihak. nikitâpamikwak nitôtêmak tâpiskôc nawac piko ê-ânwêhktahkik ôma kâ-itahkamiksiyân. nipêhonân ta-pâsot and pikiw, piyisk pâsow êkwa kihtwâm nipôsinân. kâ-mâtwê-têpwêcik nitôtêmak.

ᐃᐢᐲᕁ  ᑳ ᐯ ᓈᓯᐯᐦᑌᔮᐣ  ᑮ ᑕᑲᐦᑭ ᑲᐧᐦᑯᑌᐤ  ᑯᑕᐋᐧᐣ᙮  ᐁᑯᑕ  ᓂᑮ ᐊᑎ ᑎᐦᑭᓵᐧᐤ  ᐊᓇ  ᒥᓇᐦᐃᐠ ᐱᑭᐤ᙮  ᑳ ᑮ ᑮᓯ ᑎᐦᑭᓱᐟ  ᐊᓇ  ᐱᑭᐤ  ᓂᑮ ᐊᑎ ᒦᓴᐦᐁᐣ  ᓂᒌᒫᓂᒥᓈᐣ  ᐁᐊᐧᑯ  ᐱᑭᐤ  ᐁ ᐋᐸᒋᐦᐊᐠ᙮  ᓂᑭᑖᐸᒥᑲᐧᐠ  ᓂᑑᑌᒪᐠ  ᑖᐱᐢᑰᐨ  ᓇᐊᐧᐨ  ᐱᑯ  ᐁ ᐋᓀᐧᐦᐠᑕᐦᑭᐠ  ᐆᒪ  ᑳ ᐃᑕᐦᑲᒥᐠᓯᔮᐣ᙮  ᓂᐯᐦᐅᓈᐣ  ᑕ ᐹᓱᐟ  ᐊᐣd  ᐱᑭᐤ,  ᐱᔨᐢᐠ  ᐹᓱᐤ  ᐁᑲᐧ  ᑭᐦᑖᐧᒼ  ᓂᐴᓯᓈᐣ᙮  ᑳ ᒫᑌᐧ ᑌᐯᐧᒋᐠ  ᓂᑑᑌᒪᐠ᙮

When I went to the shore there was a good fire going so there I began to melt the pine-pitch. When it was done melting I began to patch our canoe using that pine-pitch. My friends looked at me as if they doubted that I knew what I was doing. We waited for the pine-pitch to melt and once again we boarded the canoe. My friends called out.

“namôya awasimê ohcisitin! wahwâ! tânisi ôma ê-isi-kiskêyihtaman ta-mîsahaman cîmân?”

“ᓇᒨᔭ  ᐊᐊᐧᓯᒣ  ᐅᐦᒋᓯᑎᐣ!  ᐊᐧᐦᐋᐧ!  ᑖᓂᓯ  ᐆᒪ  ᐁ ᐃᓯ ᑭᐢᑫᔨᐦᑕᒪᐣ  ᑕ ᒦᓴᐦᐊᒪᐣ  ᒌᒫᐣ?”

“There is no more leak! Holy! How did you know how to do that to patch the canoe?”

“kayâs iyiniw mamahtâwisiwin anima. kayâs iyiniw ê-kî-kiskinwahamowit, nohtâwîpan.”

“ᑲᔮᐢ  ᐃᔨᓂᐤ  ᒪᒪᐦᑖᐃᐧᓯᐃᐧᐣ  ᐊᓂᒪ᙮  ᑲᔮᐢ  ᐃᔨᓂᐤ  ᐁ ᑮ ᑭᐢᑭᓇᐧᐦᐊᒧᐃᐧᐟ,  ᓄᐦᑖᐄᐧᐸᐣ᙮”

“It’s an old Indian trick. An old Indian taught me, my late father.”

Word List

ahâw
ᐊᐦᐋᐤ
okay
âmaciwîspimowinihk
ᐋᒪᒋᐄᐧᐢᐱᒧᐃᐧᓂᕁ
Stanley Mission
anima
ᐊᓂᒪ
that
ânwêhta
ᐋᓀᐧᐦᑕ
disbelieve it
(VTI-1)
âpacih
ᐋᐸᒋᐦ
use s.o.
(VTA)
asowaha
ᐊᓱᐊᐧᐦᐊ
go across it
(VTI-1)
ati
ᐊᑎ
begin
cêskwa
ᒉᐢᑲᐧ
wait
cîm
ᒌᒼ
board with
(VTA)
cîmân
ᒌᒫᐣ
canoe
ê-kî-kiskinwahamowit
ᐁ ᑮ ᑭᐢᑭᓇᐧᐦᐊᒧᐃᐧᐟ
he/she taught me
(VTA Inv)
êkota
ᐁᑯᑕ
there
êkwa
ᐁᑲᐧ
and
isiyihkâtêw
ᐃᓯᔨᐦᑳᑌᐤ
it is called
ispîhk
ᐃᐢᐲᕁ
when
itahkamikisi
ᐃᑕᐦᑲᒥᑭᓯ
do an action
(VAI)
itâpi
ᐃᑖᐱ
look in a direction
(VAI)
kâ-mâyiciwasik
ᑳ ᒫᔨᒋᐊᐧᓯᐠ
place of difficult current
kapêsi
ᑲᐯᓯ
camp
(VAI)
kayâs iyiniw
ᑲᔮᐢ ᐃᔨᓂᐤ
long ago Indian
kêtahtaw
ᑫᑕᐦᑕᐤ
suddenly
kihtwâm
ᑭᐦᑖᐧᒼ
again
kiskêyihta
ᑭᐢᑫᔨᐦᑕ
know it
(VTI-1)
kitôtinaw
ᑭᑑᑎᓇᐤ
our boat
kospi
ᑯᐢᐱ
go inland
kotawân
ᑯᑕᐋᐧᐣ
campfire
kotawê
ᑯᑕᐁᐧ
make a fire
kwahkotêw
ᑲᐧᐦᑯᑌᐤ
it is on fire
(VII)
kwatapina
ᑲᐧᑕᐱᓇ
turn it over
(VTI-1)
mâhtâwi sîpiy
ᒫᐦᑖᐃᐧ ᓰᐱᕀ
Churchill River
mamahtâwisiwin
ᒪᒪᐦᑖᐃᐧᓯᐃᐧᐣ
trick/skill
mâmihk
ᒫᒥᕁ
downriver
matwê
ᒪᑌᐧ
in the distance
minahik
ᒥᓇᐦᐃᐠ
pine
minahik pikiw
ᒥᓇᐦᐃᐠ ᐱᑭᐤ
pine pitch
miniscikos
ᒥᓂᐢᒋᑯᐢ
small islan
mîsaha
ᒦᓴᐦᐊ
patch/mend
(VTI-1)
misakâ
ᒥᓴᑳ
arrive by water
(VAI)
miskaw
ᒥᐢᑲᐤ
finds s.o.
(VTA)
mostihtakohk
ᒧᐢᑎᐦᑕᑯᕁ
at the bottom
namôya awasimê
ᓇᒨᔭ ᐊᐊᐧᓯᒣ
no more
nâsipêhtê
ᓈᓯᐯᐦᑌ
go toward shore by foot
(VAI)
nawac piko
ᓇᐊᐧᐨ ᐱᑯ
more so
nicîmâniminân
ᓂᒌᒫᓂᒥᓈᐣ
our canoe
nikî itâwak
ᓂᑮ ᐃᑖᐊᐧᐠ
I said to them
(VTA)
nikitâpamikwak
ᓂᑭᑖᐸᒥᑲᐧᐠ
they look at me
(VTA Inv)
nîpin
ᓃᐱᐣ
it summer
nistam
ᓂᐢᑕᒼ
first
nitawi
ᓂᑕᐃᐧ
go and
(PV)
nitonaw
ᓂᑐᓇᐤ
look for s.o.
(VTA)
nitôtêm
ᓂᑑᑌᒼ
my friend
niya
ᓂᔭ
me/I
nohtâwîpan
ᓄᐦᑖᐄᐧᐸᐣ
my late father
ohci
ᐅᐦᒋ
from
ohcistin
ᐅᐦᒋᐢᑎᐣ
it leaks
(VII)
ohcistinisi
ᐅᐦᒋᐢᑎᓂᓯ
have a leak
(VAI)
ôma
ᐆᒪ –ᐟᐦᐃᐢ
this
papâmiskâ
ᐸᐹᒥᐢᑳ
paddle about/canoe
pâso
ᐹᓱ
dry
(VAI)
pâwiscikosihk
ᐹᐃᐧᐢᒋᑯᓯᕁ
at the little rapids
pêho
ᐯᐦᐅ
wait
(VAI)
pêyakwâw
ᐯᔭᑳᐧᐤ
once
pikiw
ᐱᑭᐤ
pine pitch
pimitisaha
ᐱᒥᑎᓴᐦᐊ
follow it
(VTI-1)
piysik
ᐱᕀᓯᐠ
eventually
pôsi
ᐴᓯ
get on board
(VAI)
sâkahikanisîs
ᓵᑲᐦᐃᑲᓂᓰᐢ
small lake
sîskipita
ᓰᐢᑭᐱᑕ
pull it in
(VTI-1)
takahki
ᑕᑲᐦᑭ
wonderful;
takocimê
ᑕᑯᒋᒣ
arrive by canoe/boat
(VAI)
tânisi ôma
ᑖᓂᓯ ᐆᒪ
how is it
tâpiskôc
ᑖᐱᐢᑰᐨ
just like
tâpwê mâni mâka
ᑖᐯᐧ ᒫᓂ ᒫᑲ
it is true
têpwê
ᑌᐯᐧ
call out/yell
(VAI)
tihkis
ᑎᐦᑭᐢ
melt s.o.
(VTA)
tipiskâw
ᑎᐱᐢᑳᐤ
it is night
(VII)
wahwâ
ᐊᐧᐦᐋᐧ
holy
wâpan
ᐋᐧᐸᐣ
it is dawn
(VII)
wapâs
ᐊᐧᐹᐢ
small narrows
wapâsihk
ᐊᐧᐹᓯᕁ
at a small narrows
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6. Kindness – kisêwâtisiwin – ᑭᓭᐋᐧᑎᓯᐃᐧᐣ

Solomon Ratt: Cree Cultural Teachings – nêhiyaw-isîhcikêwin – ᓀᐦᐃᔭᐤᐃᓯᐦᒋᑫᐃᐧ

Kindness Image

 

kayâs kâkî-awâsisiwiyâhk nikî-wîcihinân nohtâwîpan ta-nikohtawât atâwêwikimâwa. osâm-piko kapê-nîpin nikî-nikohtânân natamihk nîkinâhk ohci. nohtâwîpan kî-kâh-kîskatahahtikwêw êkwa nîyanân nikî-nâsipêyâwatânân anihi mihta. nikî-sôhki-atoskânân mâna. piyisk mihcêt mihta nikî-âwatânân êkwa mihtot nikî-osîhtânân. nîstâw nikî-pê-wîcihikonân ta-pimitâpihpâhtwât otôtihk ohci, ta-sakahpitahk anima mihtot otôtihk. nikî-itikawinân ta-pôsiyâhk ôsihk mâka nikî-akâwâtênân tahkohc mihtotihk ta-pôsiyâhk. kî-pâhpisiw nohtâwîpaninân mâka nikî-pakitinikonân tahkohc mihtotihk ta-pôsiyâhk. wahwâ! kwayask kî-môcikan!

ᑲᔮᐢ  ᑳᑮ ᐊᐋᐧᓯᓯᐃᐧᔮᕁ  ᓂᑮ ᐄᐧᒋᐦᐃᓈᐣ  ᓄᐦᑖᐄᐧᐸᐣ  ᑕ ᓂᑯᐦᑕᐋᐧᐟ  ᐊᑖᐁᐧᐃᐧᑭᒫᐊᐧ᙮  ᐅᓵᒼ ᐱᑯ  ᑲᐯ ᓃᐱᐣ  ᓂᑮ ᓂᑯᐦᑖᓈᐣ  ᓇᑕᒥᕁ  ᓃᑭᓈᕁ  ᐅᐦᒋ᙮  ᓄᐦᑖᐄᐧᐸᐣ  ᑮ ᑳᐦ ᑮᐢᑲᑕᐦᐊᐦᑎᑫᐧᐤ  ᐁᑲᐧ  ᓃᔭᓈᐣ  ᓂᑮ ᓈᓯᐯᔮᐊᐧᑖᓈᐣ  ᐊᓂᐦᐃ  ᒥᐦᑕ᙮  ᓂᑮ ᓲᐦᑭ ᐊᑐᐢᑳᓈᐣ  ᒫᓇ᙮  ᐱᔨᐢᐠ  ᒥᐦᒉᐟ  ᒥᐦᑕ  ᓂᑮ ᐋᐊᐧᑖᓈᐣ  ᐁᑲᐧ  ᒥᐦᑐᐟ  ᓂᑮ ᐅᓰᐦᑖᓈᐣ᙮  ᓃᐢᑖᐤ  ᓂᑮ ᐯ ᐄᐧᒋᐦᐃᑯᓈᐣ  ᑕ ᐱᒥᑖᐱᐦᐹᐦᑖᐧᐟ  ᐅᑑᑎᕁ  ᐅᐦᒋ,  ᑕ ᓴᑲᐦᐱᑕᕁ  ᐊᓂᒪ  ᒥᐦᑐᐟ  ᐅᑑᑎᐦᐠ᙮  ᓂᑮ ᐃᑎᑲᐃᐧᓈᐣ  ᑕ ᐴᓯᔮᕁ  ᐆᓯᕁ  ᒫᑲ  ᓂᑮ ᐊᑳᐋᐧᑌᓈᐣ  ᑕᐦᑯᐦᐨ  ᒥᐦᑐᑎᕁ  ᑕ ᐴᓯᔮᐦᐠ᙮  ᑮ ᐹᐦᐱᓯᐤ  ᓄᐦᑖᐄᐧᐸᓂᓈᐣ  ᒫᑲ  ᓂᑮ ᐸᑭᑎᓂᑯᓈᐣ  ᑕᐦᑯᐦᐨ  ᒥᐦᑐᑎᕁ  ᑕ ᐴᓯᔮᐦᐠ᙮  ᐊᐧᐦᐋᐧ!  ᑲᐧᔭᐢᐠ  ᑮ ᒨᒋᑲᐣ!

A long time ago when we were children we helped our father to cut wood for the store keeper. We worked almost all summer at cutting wood upriver from our home. My father would chop down the trees and we would haul them down to the river. We worked hard. Eventually we had a lot of wood, so we made a raft. My brother-in-law came to help us to drag the raft with his motor boat, to tie the raft to his boat. We were told to get into the boat but we wanted to ride on top of the raft. My father laughed but he let us ride on top of the raft. Holy! It was a lot of fun.

Word List:

akâwâta
ᐊᑳᐋᐧᑕ
desire/want it
(VTI-1)
anihi
ᐊᓂᐦᐃ
those
atâwêwikimâw
ᐊᑖᐁᐧᐃᐧᑭᒫᐤ
store clerk/boss
âwatâ
ᐋᐊᐧᑖ
haul it
(VTI-2)
kapê-nîpin
ᑲᐯ ᓃᐱᐣ
all summer
kîskatahahtikwê
ᑮᐢᑲᑕᐦᐊᐦᑎᑫᐧ
chop down tree
(VAI)
kwayask  kî-môcikan
ᑲᐧᔭᐢᐠ  ᑮ ᒨᒋᑲᐣ
it was a lot of fun!
mâna
ᒫᓇ
usually
mihcêt
ᒥᐦᒉᐟ
lots
mihta
ᒥᐦᑕ
firewood
(pl)
mihtot
ᒥᐦᑐᐟ
a raft
nâsipêyâwatâ
ᓈᓯᐯᔮᐊᐧᑖ
carry it to the shore
(VTI-2)
natamihk
ᓇᑕᒥᕁ
upriver
nikî-itikawinân
ᓂᑮ ᐃᑎᑲᐃᐧᓈᐣ
we were told
(VTA-Inv. 1P)
nikî-pakitinikonân
ᓂᑮ ᐸᑭᑎᓂᑯᓈᐣ
he/she allowed us
(VTA-Inv. IP)
nîkinâhk
ᓃᑭᓈᕁ
at our home
nikohtaw
ᓂᑯᐦᑕᐤ
prepare firewood for s.o.
(VTA)
nikohtê
ᓂᑯᐦᑌ
prepare firewood
(VAI)
nîstâw
ᓃᐢᑖᐤ
my brother-in-law
nîyanân
ᓃᔭᓈᐣ
us
nohtâwîpan
ᓄᐦᑖᐄᐧᐸᐣ
my late father
ohci
ᐅᐦᒋ
from
osâm-piko
ᐅᓵᒼ ᐱᑯ
mostly
osîhtâ
ᐅᓰᐦᑖ
make it
(VTI-2)
otôtihk
ᐅᑑᑎᕁ
in his boat
pâhpisi
ᐹᐦᐱᓯ
laugh a little
(VAI)
pimitâpihpâhtwâ
ᐱᒥᑖᐱᐦᐹᐦᑖᐧ
drag it on the water
(VTI-2)
pôsi
ᐴᓯ
get on board
(VAI)
sakahpita
ᓴᑲᐦᐱᑕ
tie it
(VTI-1)
sôhki-atoskê
ᓲᐦᑭ ᐊᑐᐢᑫ
work hard
(VAI)
tahkohc
ᑕᐦᑯᐦᐨ
on top
wîcih
ᐄᐧᒋᐦ
help s.o.
(VTA)
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5. Faith – tâpokêyihtamowin – ᑖᐳᑫᔨᐦᑕᒧᐃᐧᐣ

Fai

kayâs kâ-kî-awâsisiwiyân nikî-pah-pimohtêhonân mâna misiwê itê mâhtâwi-sîpîhk. pêyakwâw ê-sîkwahk nikî-wâpamânân môswa ê-âsowahahk sâkahikan. kêsiskaw kî-otihtinam pîminahkwân nôhkomis êkwa kî-ati-tâpakwêwêpinêw êwakoni môswa. mâka ana môswa kwayask nikî-sîkihik ayisk mêtoni kêhciwâk cîmânihk ita kâ-apiwak ê-pê-isicimêt. piyisk âtawiya kî-nipahêw êwakoni môswa nôhkomis ê-mwayî-kwatapiskamwak cîmânis ispîhk kâ-kî-kakwê-tapasihak ana môswa.  awîna êtokwê nawac kî-sîkisiw, niya awêkâ cî ana môswa? matwân cî ê-kî-nitawi-wâpamât nôsî-môswa ministikohk ita kâ-kî-nihtâwikiyit oskâyisisa?

ᑲᔮᐢ  ᑳ ᑮ ᐊᐋᐧᓯᓯᐃᐧᔮᐣ  ᓂᑮ ᐸᐦ ᐱᒧᐦᑌᐦᐅᓈᐣ  ᒫᓇ  ᒥᓯᐁᐧ  ᐃᑌ  ᒫᐦᑖᐃᐧ ᓰᐲᐦᐠ᙮  ᐯᔭᑳᐧᐤ  ᐁ ᓰᑲᐧᕁ  ᓂᑮ ᐋᐧᐸᒫᓈᐣ  ᒨᓴᐧ  ᐁ ᐋᓱᐊᐧᐦᐊᕁ  ᓵᑲᐦᐃᑲᐣ᙮  ᑫᓯᐢᑲᐤ  ᑮ ᐅᑎᐦᑎᓇᒼ  ᐲᒥᓇᐦᑳᐧᐣ  ᓅᐦᑯᒥᐢ  ᐁᑲᐧ  ᑮ ᐊᑎ ᑖᐸᑫᐧᐁᐧᐱᓀᐤ  ᐁᐊᐧᑯᓂ  ᒨᓴᐧ᙮  ᒫᑲ  ᐊᓇ  ᒨᓴᐧ  ᑲᐧᔭᐢᐠ  ᓂᑮ ᓰᑭᐦᐃᐠ  ᐊᔨᐢᐠ  ᒣᑐᓂ  ᑫᐦᒋᐋᐧᐠ  ᒌᒫᓂᕁ  ᐃᑕ  ᑳ ᐊᐱᐊᐧᐠ  ᐁ ᐯ ᐃᓯᒋᒣᐟ᙮  ᐱᔨᐢᐠ  ᐋᑕᐃᐧᔭ  ᑮ ᓂᐸᐦᐁᐤ  ᐁᐊᐧᑯᓂ  ᒨᓴᐧ  ᓅᐦᑯᒥᐢ  ᐁ ᒪᐧᔩ ᑲᐧᑕᐱᐢᑲᒪᐧᐠ  ᒌᒫᓂᐢ  ᐃᐢᐲᕁ  ᑳ ᑮ ᑲᑫᐧ ᑕᐸᓯᐦᐊᐠ  ᐊᓇ  ᒨᓴᐧ᙮  ᐊᐄᐧᓇ  ᐁᑐᑫᐧ  ᓇᐊᐧᐨ  ᑮ ᓰᑭᓯᐤ,  ᓂᔭ  ᐊᐁᐧᑳ  ᒌ  ᐊᓇ  ᒨᓴᐧ?  ᒪᑖᐧᐣ  ᒌ  ᐁ ᑮ ᓂᑕᐃᐧ ᐋᐧᐸᒫᐟ  ᓅᓰ ᒨᓴᐧ  ᒥᓂᐢᑎᑯᕁ  ᐃᑕ  ᑳ ᑮ ᓂᐦᑖᐃᐧᑭᔨᐟ  ᐅᐢᑳᔨᓯᓴ?

Along time ago when I was a child we travelled all over the Churchill River. One time, in the spring, we saw a moose crossing the waters of a lake. Quickly my uncle grabbed a rope and lassoes that moose. But that moose scared me because he would swim close to where I was sitting in the canoe. Eventually my uncle killed that moose before I tipped the canoe from my attempts at getting away from it. I wonder who was more scared, me or the moose? I wonder if it was going to go see a female moose on the island where the young moose was born?

Word List:

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