Another version of Cree Literacy: The Cree story of Syllabics

Evans first syllabic font. Reproduced from John D. Nichols, 1984, Nichols, John D. 1984. The composition sequence of the first Cree hymnal. in "Essays in Algonquian Bibliography" H.C. Wolfart ed. Winnipeg: Algonquian and Iroquoian Linguistics.

Evans first syllabic font. Reproduced from John D. Nichols, 1984, Nichols, John D. 1984. The composition sequence of the first Cree hymnal. in “Essays in Algonquian Bibliography” H.C. Wolfart ed. Winnipeg: Algonquian and Iroquoian Linguistics.

The role of James Evans in the creation and popularization of syllabics is described in dozens of articles that show up in a Google search. I don’t believe any of them name his Cree collaborators, such as the many-times-great-grandfather of our friend and colleague, Ken Paupanekis, a member of Evans’s congregation at Norway House in the 1840s. Paupanekis family history recalls a respectful collaboration and cooperation between Evans’s and that ancestor. Perhaps one day Ken will share more of that important family story.

For many Cree people, Evans deserves credit not as the inventor of the script, but rather as its popularizer. In the same way that the printing press helped spread European literacy, Evans’s translation and printing of the scriptures in Cree had a substantial hand in helping to spread Cree literacy. And it spread like wildfire in its first ten years, as Cree people rapidly taught each other to read and write.

Some people believe the origin of the writing system is uniquely Cree, a gift of the Creator long before Evans arrived on the scene. Here is one version of the story, told by Winona Stevenson.

Winona Stevenson – Oral History Forum d’histoire orale, 19/20 (1999-2000), pp. 19-24.

Calling Badger

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