Simple Man: Art Napoleon (Northern y-dialect)

Skynyrd’s Simple Man in Nîhiyawîwin (Northern Cree Y dialect)

Art Napoleon’s translation of Skynyrd’s “Simple Man”

Thank you, Art, for permitting us to share your new translation (and thank you, Sol, for editorial help!) Nice performance! 

nimâmâ î-kî-wîhtamawit
kâkî-apisîsisiyân
ôta wîtapamin kiya nikosis
kwayask nitohta kâ-wîhtamâtân
ôtî nîkân ka-miyo-âpatan
tâpwî
kiyâm piyahtik kâya osâm sohki
âyiman kîkway ka-miyâskatîn
iskwîw miskamâso mitoni ka-sâkihik
kâya wanikiskisi ôtî awiyak ispimihk.

Chorus
kakwî-iyinito-nâpîwi
sâkihitowin ka-nisitohtîn
kakwî-iyinito-nâpîwi
ômisi tôta nikosis ka-kaskihtân

Here’s a YouTube version of a 2015 Skynyrd performance:  
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mqfwbf3X8SA

Posted in Art Napoleon, Audio (y-dialect), Songs in Cree, Video | Leave a comment

In the Beginning (Bible Story): Dolores Sand (y-dialect)

Dolores Sand (aka “The Creeture”) prepared this video reading (and others) to share through the FaceBook group of Muskoday First Nation Community School

This video presents a children’s version of the Bible’s Creation Story. The book, “In the Beginning,” is one of a thirty-volume set of Bible stories – all in Plains Cree – published by the Canadian Bible Society (and available there for purchase). The stories were translated into Cree by Dolores and Gayle Weenie. 

The books are only available as a boxed set (at $100, that works out to under $3.50 per volume). What the website doesn’t mention is that each purchase includes access to all thirty books in e-reader format, and the e-reader copy includes professionally recorded audio featuring Dolores herself. (Find the series’ Christmas story here with a demo of the e-reader format: Jesus is Born: Dolores Sand (y-dialect))

 

Posted in Audio (y-dialect), Books for Kids, Dolores Sand | Leave a comment

Caring: Solomon Ratt (y-dialect)

nâkatohkêyimâwasowin
ᓈᑲᑐᐦᑫᔨᒫᐘᓱᐏᐣ
Caring

“A well-spoken sentence in Aturan is a straight line pointing. A well-spoken sentence in Aden is like a spiderweb, each strand with a meaning of its own, a piece of something greater, more complex.” Patrick Rothfuss.

Cree is like Rothfuss’s Adem, except words operate ‘like spiderwebs, each strand with a meaning of its own….’ Take, for example, the word nâkatohkêyimâwasowin “caring” also conveys the ideas of paying close attention, looking after someone, attending to others, and listening closely to others. Much like these geese tend to their young.

Posted in Audio (y-dialect), Learn New Words, Solomon Ratt | Leave a comment

miyo-okâwîmâwi-kîsikanisik: Happy Mother’s Day 2020

ᐊᑕᐦᑯᕽ ᑭᑐᐦᒌᐣ ~ atahkohk kitohcîn ~ You come from the stars. Karlee Fellner, 2020

kikâwînawak kikî-sâkihikonawak pâmwayês ê-nihtâwikiyahk.
ᑭᑳᐑᓇᐘᐠ ᑭᑮ ᓵᑭᐦᐃᑯᓇᐘᐠ ᐹᒷᔦᐢ ᐁ ᓂᐦᑖᐏᑭᔭᕽ᙮
Our mothers loved us before we were born.

Thanks to Karlee Fellner, celebrating her first Mother’s Day-in-waiting, for allowing us to share this image she painted for her own unborn child. It reminds us all of how we were each loved by our mothers, even before we were born. 

Happy Mother’s Day to mothers everywhere. (Be sure to add the plural (k) if you’re speaking to more than one mother!) 

  • miyo-okâwîmâwi-kîsikanisi(k)   (y-dialect)
  • mino-okâwîmâwi-kîsikanisi(k)   (n-dialect)
  • mitho-okâwîmâwi-kîsikanisi(k)   (th-dialect)
Posted in Audio (y-dialect), Mother's Day, Solomon Ratt | 3 Comments

kîs’kaw (For a Moment): Wayne Jackson (Northern y-dialect)

Thanks to Wayne Jackson for sharing this song, written for the MMIW of Canada in 2009 as part of the CD compilation “Colours of My Life”

Visit ReverbNation to find more of Wayne’s recordings. 

opêpêmow, sipwêpiciw,
nakatêw onêkîhikwa,
wahyaw itohtêw,
mâtoyiwa ocânisa,
wîsta mâtow
mâmitonêyimêw wîtisâna,
She has a baby, she’s moved away,
She left her parents,
She’s gone oh so far,
Her baby cries, she cries along,
She’s thinking of her siblings too,
Chorus:
kîs'kaw kîwêtotâtam,
ê-kî-sâkihêt,
kîs'kaw kîwêtotâtam,
cîkêyihtamowin,
Chorus: For one moment she was at home,
Where she was loved,
For one moment she was at home,
Happiness,
wâstahikêw, pôsipayihow,
îskwayâc kî-wâpamâw,
kî-miskawâw,
mâtoyiwa ocânisa, wîsta okâwiya,
ê-mâmitonêyimêt kâkikê,
She hitchhikes, she gets into the vehicle,
That’s the last time she’s seen,
She is found (murdered)
Her baby cries, her mom does too,
She’s thought of all the time,
kîs'kaw kîwêtotâtam,
ê-kî-sâkihêt,
kîs'kaw kîwêtotâtam,
cîkêyihtamowin,
Chorus: For one moment she was at home,
Where she was loved,
For one moment she was at home,
Happiness,
mâtoyiwa ocânisa, wîsta okâwiya,
ê-mâmitonêyimêt kâkikê.
Her baby cries, her mom does too,
She’s thought of all the time.

Posted in Audio (y-dialect), Songs in Cree, Wayne (Goodspirit) Jackson | Leave a comment

The Middle Sibling: Solomon Ratt (th-dialect; y-dialect)

Sol (the middle sibling) between two of his brothers. no date.

A practice dialogue for students to describe the makeup of their family. Continue reading

Posted in Audio (th-dialect), Kinship, Solomon Ratt | Leave a comment

Stay home: Learn Cree -29. Simon Bird – Thinking of You

While we’re all in isolation, we’re going to try to post one video a day from Sol’s existing teaching library, and the teaching libraries of some of his friends. Like Sasquatch himself, Solomon Ratt has experience with self isolation. Who better to help out with online Cree lessons for remote learning?  

A video lesson today from Simon Bird #CreeSimonSays, that gives us words to reach out and offer solace to one person or to several with grace. Thanks, Simon: kimâmitonêyimitinân kîsta. 

Thinking of you:

y-dialect 

  • I am thinking of you (one): kimâmitonêyimitin
  • I am thinking of  you (all): kimâmitonêyimitinâwâw
  • We are thinking of you (one): kimâmitonêyimitinân
  • We are thinking of you (all) : kimâmitonêyimitinân

th-dialect 

  • I am thinking of you (one): kimâmitonîthimitin
  • I am thinking of  you (all): kimâmitonîthimitinâwâw
  • We are thinking of you (one): kimâmitonîthimitinân
  • We are thinking of you (all) : kimâmitonîthimitinân

n-dialect 

  • I am thinking of you (one): kimâmitonênimitin
  • I am thinking of  you (all): kimâmitonênimitinâwâw
  • We are thinking of you (one): kimâmitonênimitinân
  • We are thinking of you (all) : kimâmitonênimitinân

Words to use in response (y, th- and n-dialects) 

To respond that you are thinking of them in return, you can add one of these pronouns onto the verb forms given above, or just use the pronoun on its own. Remember that Cree has different forms of you for singular and plural (one person or many). 

  • you, too; you as well: kîsta 
  • we, too; we-and-you, too; all of us as well: kîstanaw
  • you (all), too; you (all) as well: kîstawâw 

(About Sol’s shirt: https://creeliteracy.org/2020/03/17/awas-go-away-most-dialects/)

Posted in Audio (th-dialect), Audio (y-dialect), Cree Language Classes, In person or Online, Language Lessons, Simon Bird (#CreeSimonSays), Stay Home: Learn Cree, Video | Leave a comment

Stay home: Learn Cree -28. Days of the Week

While we’re all in isolation, we’re going to try to post one video a day from Sol’s existing teaching library, and the teaching libraries of some of his friends. Like Sasquatch himself, Solomon Ratt has experience with self isolation. Who better to help out with online Cree lessons for remote learning?  

Today, we focus on days of the week, first, simply reading and reciting them in y- or th-dialect (as you prefer), and then in another of Sol’s (y-dialect) teaching video that uses the days of the week to illustrate daily activities and telling time. 

Y-dialectTh-dialectEnglish
ayamihêwikîsikâwayamihikîsikâwSunday
pêyakokîsikâwpiyakokîsikâwMonday
nîsokîsikâwnîsokîsikâwTuesday
nistokîsikâwnistokîsikâwWednesday
nêwokîsikâwniyokîsikâwThursday
niyânanokîsikâwniyânanokîsikâwFriday
nikotwâsokîsikâwmâtinâwikîsikâwSaturday

 

(About Sol’s shirt: https://creeliteracy.org/2020/03/17/awas-go-away-most-dialects/)

Posted in Audio (th-dialect), Audio (y-dialect), Cree Language Classes, In person or Online, Language Lessons, Solomon Ratt, Stay Home: Learn Cree, Video | Leave a comment

Stay home: Learn Cree -27. A simple conversation

While we’re all in isolation, we’re going to try to post one video a day from Sol’s existing teaching library, and the teaching libraries of some of his friends. Like Sasquatch himself, Solomon Ratt has experience with self isolation. Who better to help out with online Cree lessons for remote learning?  

Today we offer a brief conversation with audio, borrowed directly from Ken Paupanekis’s Introduction to Cree Language course, which he has taught for years at University College of the North and the University of Manitoba. Ken is an n-dialect speaker from kinosêwi-sîpiy (Norway House, MB). His friend Loretta is from pimicikamâk (Cross Lake, MB). 

In this little conversation, the only words that vary with dialect are the personal pronouns:

nîna > niya > nîtha “I, me”
kîna > kiya > kîtha “you” 

In the text (below), we have followed Ken’s habit of underlining the N sound that changes (to help readers adjust for their own dialect). If you’d like to substitute the name of your own home community, you can look it up here.  

Since Elders teach that saying a real “goodbye” is not part of Cree culture, you might also notice that Ken and Loretta close the conversation with kîhtwâm kika-wâpamitin: “I’ll see you again,” which is often casually shorted to kîhtwâm. 

Ken: tânisi, Ken nîna. awêna kîna? 
Loretta: Loretta nîna.
Ken: kinosêwi-sîpiy ohci nîna. tânitê ohci kîna? 
Loretta: pimicikamâk ohci nîna.
Ken: kîhtwâm kika-wâpamitin.
Loretta: êkosi, kîhtwâm kika-wâpamitin. 

K: How are you, I’m Ken. What’s your name?
L: I’m Loretta.
K: I’m from Norway House. Where are you from?
L: I’m from Cross Lake. 
K: I’ll see you again,
L: That’s good. I’ll see you again. 

When you’re ready for more, you can find more of Ken’s Intro Cree audio files here: 
https://creeliteracy.org/for-language-learners/ken-paupanekis-audio-files-for-introductory-cree/ (Conversation features in the second recording for each unit). 

(About Sol’s shirt: https://creeliteracy.org/2020/03/17/awas-go-away-most-dialects/)

Posted in Audio (n-dialect), Ken Paupanekis, Language Lessons, Stay Home: Learn Cree | Leave a comment

Stay home: Learn Cree – 26. Covid kâhkâkiw

While we’re all in isolation, we’re going to try to post one video a day from Sol’s existing teaching library, and the teaching libraries of some of his friends. Like Sasquatch himself, Solomon Ratt has experience with self isolation. Who better to help out with online Cree lessons for remote learning?  

Manitoba Cree elders and healthcare workers recently produced this video in Cree, featuring kahkakiw (SRO: kâhkâkiw), a Cree-speaking raven puppet who gives really useful explanation in Cree of social distancing and disease transmission. Learn more about the team of creators here: http://covid19indigenous.ca/who-we-are/research-team/

Our good friend Bill Jancewicz works in Labrador supporting speakers and students of Naskapi, the eastern-most member of the Cree language family. He first spotted our raven friend all the way out east, and sent him back over this way to visit.  

Here’s the story as presented by CBC: https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/manitoba/covid-health-information-cree-raven-1.5528099

(About Sol’s shirt: https://creeliteracy.org/2020/03/17/awas-go-away-most-dialects/)

Posted in Audio (th-dialect), Language Lessons, Learn New Words, Solomon Ratt, Stay Home: Learn Cree, Video | Leave a comment