Stay home: Learn Cree – 18. Wayne Jackson: Syllabics Song

While we’re all in isolation, we’re going to try to post one video a day from Sol’s existing teaching library, and the teaching libraries of some of his friends. Like Sasquatch himself, Solomon Ratt has experience with self isolation. Who better to help out with online Cree lessons for remote learning?  

This little song, written by Alberta Elder Jerry Saddleback, teaches the syllabic chart. It is sung here by Wayne Jackson to his smallest (and indisputably cutest) Cree student ever. Use the chart below to sing along! 

If you’re ready to learn more about Cree syllabics and how they compare with SRO spelling, here’s a link to a recent blog post from the Government of Canada’s “Our Languages” blog. (You might recognize the names of its authors!)

(About Sol’s shirt: https://creeliteracy.org/2020/03/17/awas-go-away-most-dialects/)

Posted in Audio (y-dialect), Cree Cultural Literacy, Language Lessons, Songs in Cree, Stay Home: Learn Cree, Video, Wayne (Goodspirit) Jackson | Leave a comment

Stay home: Learn Cree – 17. Dolores Greyeyes Sand, Classics in Cree

While we’re all in isolation, we’re going to try to post one video a day from Sol’s existing teaching library, and the teaching libraries of some of his friends. Like Sasquatch himself, Solomon Ratt has experience with self isolation. Who better to help out with online Cree lessons for remote learning?  

To shake things up a little this weekend, we have a singalong treat from Dolores Greyeyes Sand. Dolores is widely known for the fun she creates translating Rock and Country classic tunes into Cree – most often with the help of elders from Muskeg Lake Cree Nation. Today’s she’s sharing all nine tracks from her 2004 CD, Classics in Cree, complete with lyrics in SRO. (Here’s a link to our original post from 2016). She and I both hope you sing and laugh! 

  1. nipīkinipayin (I Fall to Pieces)
  2. ēkāy ka-mātokāsoyan (Don’t Come Crying to Me)
  3. kapētipisk ka-nīmihitonaw (Rock Around the Clock)
  4. ninanamipayin (All Shook Up)
  5. kiya ē-kī-ohpiniyan (Wind Beneath My Wings)
  6. ocitaw kisãkihitin (Can’t Help Falling in Love)
  7. sãkihitowin (The Rose)
  8. kihci-kisēwãtisiwin (Amazing Grace)
  9. kīspin kisãkihin (Heel and Toe Polka)

(About Sol’s shirt: https://creeliteracy.org/2020/03/17/awas-go-away-most-dialects/)

Posted in Audio (y-dialect), Cree Cultural Literacy, Dolores Sand, Language Lessons, Songs in Cree, Stay Home: Learn Cree | Leave a comment

Stay home: Learn Cree – 19. Social Distancing

While we’re all in isolation, we’re going to try to post one video a day from Sol’s existing teaching library, and the teaching libraries of some of his friends. Like Sasquatch himself, Solomon Ratt has experience with self isolation. Who better to help out with online Cree lessons for remote learning?  

Today, three printable social reminders, thanks to Belinda Daniels and her colleagues at nêhiyawak Language Experience. The first two offer culturally appropriate social distancing reminders. The third offers every-day advice for staying healthy at home (scroll down for audio thanks to Randy Morin). (Remember to use option-click or alt-click on the typed text following the images to look up each word in the itwêwina online dictionary). 

piskihtisik kanakê nîso amiskwak isi.

nânitaw pêyak iyâpêw ka-isi-kinosit. 

  • tâhto-kîsikaw itohtamowina
  • postâyawinisê
  • wayawi
  • kakwê waskawê
  • kiyokê
  • kitâpimiso
  • kâya osâm mistahi âpacihtâ mamâtawi-âpacihcikan
  • kakwê miyo-itohta
  • kanâcihcikê
  • kâya kosta ta-kakwêcihkêmoyan
  • mistahi nipiy minihkwê êkwa miyo mîcisowina kakwê míci
  • kakwê kiskisi, aciyaw ôma piko ôm ôma 

(About Sol’s shirt: https://creeliteracy.org/2020/03/17/awas-go-away-most-dialects/)

Posted in Audio (y-dialect), Cree Cultural Literacy, Stay Home: Learn Cree, Video | Leave a comment

Stay home: Learn Cree – 16. Dorothy Thunder Introduces Animate and Inanimate

While we’re all in isolation, we’re going to try to post one video a day from Sol’s existing teaching library, and the teaching libraries of some of his friends. Like Sasquatch himself, Solomon Ratt has experience with self isolation. Who better to help out with online Cree lessons for remote learning?  

Today we have a lesson from Dorothy Thunder who gently dips our collective toes into animacy. Linguists refer to this as “grammatical gender.” In the same way that every noun in French is either masculine or feminine, every noun in Cree is either animate or inanimate. 

Dorothy begins her lesson with a selection of animate and inanimate nouns. Next, she moves on to their corresponding demonstratives (awa for animate, ôma for inanimate), then goes one step further, moving into the verb forms that must also change their shapes to match their animate or inanimate objects.  

(About Sol’s shirt: https://creeliteracy.org/2020/03/17/awas-go-away-most-dialects/)

Posted in Audio (y-dialect), Dorothy Thunder, Language Lessons, Stay Home: Learn Cree, Video | Leave a comment

Stay home: Learn Cree – 15. Colours

While we’re all in isolation, we’re going to try to post one video a day from Sol’s existing teaching library, and the teaching libraries of some of his friends. Like Sasquatch himself, Solomon Ratt has experience with self isolation. Who better to help out with online Cree lessons for remote learning?  

Today we have a lesson in colour terms from Pearleen Kanewopasikot who shows us her enviable ribbon collection. Unlike English, where the colour words are adjectives that stay the same no matter what, colour words in Cree are verbs, so they have to match corresponding nouns in animacy. Listen closely to hear her adapt the terms she uses to distinguish various shades of yellow and orange! (Here’s a lesson link that explains colour terms in more detail). 

  • cahkasinastêw (inanimate verb) it is spotted, it is covered in polka-dots
  • sênipân – ribbon (animate noun) 

(About Sol’s shirt: https://creeliteracy.org/2020/03/17/awas-go-away-most-dialects/)

Posted in Audio (y-dialect), Language Lessons, Pearleen Kanewapasikot, Stay Home: Learn Cree, Video | 1 Comment

Stay home: Learn Cree – 14. A little prayer (y- and th-dialects)

While we’re all in isolation, we’re going to try to post one video a day from Sol’s existing teaching library, and the teaching libraries of some of his friends. Like Sasquatch himself, Solomon Ratt has experience with self isolation. Who better to help out with online Cree lessons for remote learning?  

By request, today, a printable prayer in y- and th-dialects. Audio only, but you’re welcome to print out the image. 

y-dialect

th-dialect

(About Sol’s shirt: https://creeliteracy.org/2020/03/17/awas-go-away-most-dialects/)

Posted in Audio (y-dialect), Cree Cultural Literacy, Language Lessons, Prayers, Solomon Ratt, Stay Home: Learn Cree, Video | 1 Comment

Stay home: Learn Cree – 13. Daily Activities

While we’re all in isolation, we’re going to try to post one video a day from Sol’s existing teaching library, and the teaching libraries of some of his friends. Like Sasquatch himself, Solomon Ratt has experience with self isolation. Who better to help out with online Cree lessons for remote learning?  

In today’s video, Sol describes ordinary daily activities – and challenges listeners with questions about the content. Artwork is borrowed from Sol’s textbook, mâci-nêhiyawêwin: Beginning Cree published in 2016 and available for purchase by University of Regina Press

 

(About Sol’s shirt: https://creeliteracy.org/2020/03/17/awas-go-away-most-dialects/)

Posted in Audio (y-dialect), Cree Cultural Literacy, Language Lessons, Prayers, Solomon Ratt, Stay Home: Learn Cree, Video | Leave a comment

Stay home: Learn Cree – 12. itwêwina Click-in-text Reading Tool

While we’re all in isolation, we’re going to try to post one video a day from Sol’s existing teaching library, and the teaching libraries of some of his friends. Like Sasquatch himself, Solomon Ratt has experience with self isolation. Who better to help out with online Cree lessons for remote learning?  

Today’s video demonstrates the itwêwina click-in-text Reader tool. The click-in-text tool is built in to the Cree Literacy Network (you can tell it’s working when you see the at the left edge of the screen).

This reading tool is directly linked to the itwêwina online dictionary (based on the Wolvengrey dictionary), and is currently under development at the Alberta Language Technology Laboratory (or AltLab) at the University of Alberta. 

 

(About Sol’s shirt: https://creeliteracy.org/2020/03/17/awas-go-away-most-dialects/)

Posted in Audio (y-dialect), Language Lessons, Solomon Ratt, Stay Home: Learn Cree, Video | Leave a comment

Stay home: Learn Cree – 11. About Smudging

While we’re all in isolation, we’re going to try to post one video a day from Sol’s existing teaching library, and the teaching libraries of some of his friends. Like Sasquatch himself, Solomon Ratt has experience with self isolation. Who better to help out with online Cree lessons for remote learning?  

Today we’ve got three examples of kâkîsimowina: prayers or meditations for smudging.

For the very young:

The first video is a prayer simple enough for a pre-schooler, and features Darryl Chamakese’s  fine young son. 

sawêyiminân, sâkihinân, kanawêyiminân…ayhay..
mâmawi-ohtâwîmâw kinanâskomitinân…
Bless us, Love us, Protect us… Thank you. 
Father of all, we are grateful to you. 

For older children:



This meditation (with printable graphic) is suitable for older children. Provided thanks to Pearleen Kanewopasikot.

For adult beginners, ready to level up:

This third example (audio only), is more of a master class, thanks to the interpretation of Dolores Greyeyes Sand and editorial help (and reading) from Solomon Ratt. 

For people brought up in nêhiyaw tradition, smudging is a deeply personal act that needs no discussion. This post is offered to others who are striving to build Cree tradition into their personal lives.

This piece, which we might consider a text or prayer, was composed initially in English, and presented in the Facebook group Walking the Talk, A Sacred Responsibility.

nimiyâhkasikân niskîsikohk isi ta-wâpahtamân kâ-isi-miywâsik askiy, êkosi nikakî-wâpahtên kâ-isi-miyosicik ayisiniwak mîna nîsta.I bring the smoke up over my eyes so that I can see the true beauty of the world, so that I can see beauty in others and in myself.
nimiyâhkasikân niskiwanihk isi ta-pasoyân ka-oskimâkwahk askiy mîna nimawimostamawâwak kahkiyaw ayisiyiniwak kâ-pimohtêcik ta-kihcêyihtahkik.I bring the smoke up over my nose so that I can smell the freshness of Mother Earth and pray that all those who walk upon her, do so in sacred manner.
nimiyâhkasikân nitônihk isi ta-kisêwâtisiyân mîna ta-sâkihowêyân ispîhk kâ-pîkiskwêyân.I bring the smoke up over my mouth so I can speak with kindness and love.
nimiyâhkasikân nihtawakâhk is ta-natohtamân kisêwâtisiwin ohci.I bring the smoke up over my ears so that I can hear with compassion.
nimiyâhkasikân ispimihk nistikwânihk isi êkâ ta-pakitêyimisoyân mâka ta-mâmitonêyihtamân ka-isi-kistêyimakik kahkiyaw ahcahkwak.I bring the smoke up over the top of my head so that my thoughts are not self-defeating, but instead honour my spirit and others spirits’ as well.
nimiyâhkasikân nêstakâhk isi ta-miskamân nisôhkisiwin mîna sîpihkisiwin êkosi ta-sôhkêyimisoyân, ê-kiskêyihtamân ê-sâkihit kisê-manitow.I bring the smoke over my hair so that I am connected to my inner strength and resiliency so that I can walk with confidence, knowing that I am loved by Creator.
nikisîpêkinicihcân miyâhkasikanihk ta-manâcihowêyân mîna ta-kistêyihtamâkêyân.I wash my hands with the smoke so that I touch with respect and honour.
nimiyâhkasikân nispitonihk isi ta-sâkihitowêyân.I bring forth smoke over both my arms so that I can use them to convey love.
nimiyâhkasikân misiwê nimiyâhk ta-kanâcihisoyân, ta-nahihtamân kiskinwahamâkosiwin, ta-miyo-pimâcihoyân.I bring the smoke all over the front of my body and down my back to purify my energy so that I am open to the teachings that are meant to enhance my journey.
nimiyâhkasikân nihcâyihk ta-tapahtêyimisoyân, ta-miyo-pimohtêyân nitâniskoc-wâhkômâkanak ôtê nîkân ohci.I bring the smoke downward towards my feet so that I can walk in humility and that my footsteps are guided to making a positive difference to the next seven generations.
nimiyâhkasikân nêwayak itêhkê ta-kistêyimakik nitâniskoc-wâhkômâkanak.I bring smoke up to my heart four times to represent the Four Sacred Directions in honour of my Ancestors.
nimiyâhkasikân ta-nanâskomoyân.I smudge in gratitude.

(About Sol’s shirt: https://creeliteracy.org/2020/03/17/awas-go-away-most-dialects/)

Posted in Audio (y-dialect), Cree Cultural Literacy, Language Lessons, Prayers, Solomon Ratt, Stay Home: Learn Cree, Video | Leave a comment

Stay home: Learn Cree – 10. Numbers

While we’re all in isolation, we’re going to try to post one video a day from Sol’s existing teaching library, and the teaching libraries of some of his friends. Like Sasquatch himself, Solomon Ratt has experience with self isolation. Who better to help out with online Cree lessons for remote learning?  

Today we’ve got two videos about numbers. The first is Brian MacDonald’s Numbers song (with SRO spelling corrected below). Second is a teaching video from Solomon Ratt.

This song has been taught at least a million times in Cree country. If only we could count that high!  

  1. pêyak  ᐯᔭᐠ
  2. nîso  ᓃᓱ
  3. nisto  ᓂᐢᑐ
  4. nêwo  ᓀᐓ
  5. niyânan  ᓂᔮᓇᐣ
  6. nikotwâsik  ᓂᑯᑤᓯᐠ
  7. têpakohp  ᑌᐸᑯᐦᑊ
  8. ayinânêw  ᐋᔨᓈᓀᐤ
  9. kêkâ-mitâtaht   ᑫᑲ ᒥᑖᑕᐦᐟ
  10. mitâtaht   ᒥᑖᑕᐦᐟ

Sol’s video starts with one to ten, then moves into teens, twenties, hundreds, etc., teaching the various suffixes and morphemes you need to count all day. 

(About Sol’s shirt: https://creeliteracy.org/2020/03/17/awas-go-away-most-dialects/)

Posted in Audio (y-dialect), Language Lessons, Solomon Ratt, Stay Home: Learn Cree, Video | Leave a comment